Saturday, 24 November 2007

Talking Wildlife some more

Based on comments yesterday about wildlife photos I thought I’d highlight a few more Blogs that I enjoy visiting. I have links to them all on the right column of my blog but I know these lists can look daunting to browse and it can be tricky to spot ones that may be of interest to you. So here I am sharing what I have enjoyed in these Blogs which will give you a little flavour of them.

Richard at Wildlife Photographic Journals was the first blog I found with stunning wildlife photos. Richard began posting photos in September 2006 - Happy belated Blogday to you Rich! I was absolutely thrilled to discover his blog in July – what stunning photos he has! He has lots of bird photos but it was the early morning hare shots with those beautiful brown eyes that I will always associate with him and the goldfinches caught in flight! You will these in his July 2007 posts. I am certain that all those who enjoyed Mike’s blog will spend some time on this site! I am particularly looking forward to seeing photos from a new feeding station he has set up. He also has photos taken at Zoos which is another excellent way to capture wildlife photos. Thanks Rich – please don’t stop posting. Thanks also for showing me your latest photos and allowing me to use your photo of the fox vixen above!

Gardening Blogs are another way to discover wildlife photos but unless you discover one showing wildlife on first viewing you don’t always know it is there. Many garden Blogs use labels which is a good way to find particular posts. I regularly visit my Gardening Blog links which are not restricted to the UK – in fact most in this category are from America. I have thoroughly enjoyed sharing my birds and wildlife with them, in particular the hedgehogs which is only found in pet shops there.

Robin at Robin's Nesting Place in Central Indiana USA, like myself, enjoys taking photos from her garden. I love to see her photos and it is here I have also discovered different species of our European birds for example our Coal Tit is similar to the American Chickadee. By browsing her label for Butterflies you will Painted Ladies, Monarchs, Black Swallowtails and chrysalis photos. Robin also enjoys feeding the birds in her garden and has also tried experiments with feeding the birds. I’ll let you browse to discover what she uses! She also shows photos of the American Robin and Goldfinches. More recently Robin is experimenting with methods for storing and showing her photos and is posting on her experience with this.

Videos too are a great way to show and share wildlife and I’ll come back to the UK to share two sites I have discovered with these. These sites also have photos too.

Wildlife Gardener at Our Little Corner of Paradise in Scotland writes about her making of a garden for wildlife. On the right column she has links to videos from her garden where you will see butterflies and a morning frog chorus.

Jane at Urban Extension in Dorset, England I only discovered last night through comments on my last post. Although I have only had a brief look through her site I have to say that it too has captured my interest. I enjoyed her videos of bees and butterflies and look forward to browsing more.

Finally, I would like to ask for a little help. Jane, mentioned above, has mailed me asking me how to get better quality of videos on the internet. I too would like to know the answer on that one.

I am guessing that with the millions of videos that are uploaded to the internet that file space is an issue and it is necessary for files to be compressed. I have found that not filming when there is too much movement i.e. on windy days does improve the chances. Also I’ve got a thought that greens don’t process too well – based on my attempts with plants. Maybe I am off the mark with that one!

I have over 70 videos online and some that I feel should be okay are processed very poorly. Others that could be in doubt come out fine – there is no way to know what you will get. These videos still capture the moment and it is fantastic that we can share them online but it is still very disappointing indeed when you know how the original looks.


If anyone has any tips with this please add them in my comments or email me – it would be greatly appreciated by all who do this.

The photo of the fox vixen shown above was not taken by me nor in my garden. It was taken by Richard Steel at Wildlife Photographic Journals who kindly permitted me to use it.

3 comments:

Robin's Nesting Place said...

Hi Shirl, I came by to check out the nature blogs you mentioned, and I was quite surprised to see my own blog. Thank you for your kind words.

You are right I did enjoy Richards blog. His pictures are stunning. I am amazed at the variety of wildlife he has photographed.

Here it is freezing cold outside, I'm sitting here with a heating blanket across my legs, and I'm wondering where I can go to see more wildlife to photograph. Too funny. I think I'll just stay warm and cozy and look at other peoples nature pictures for a while.
Thanks for sharing!

IndianWildlifeClub said...

I recently discovered a site called birdcinema.com, where you can upload videos. Watch "Sarang The Peacock" a video on the Indian Peafowl shot in urban Parks of Delhi.

shirl said...

Hi again, Robin and Indian Wildlife Club :-)

Robin – I hoped it would be a good surprise :-D I was sure you would enjoy Richard’s blog – his photos are stunning! It isn’t too cold here at the moment but I am sure that will change soon enough. We have strong winds predicted for the rest of the week. I hope you are warmer now and can get out with your camera soon :-D

Indian Wildlife Club – Thank-you for the bird videos link it looks very interesting :-D Thanks too for sharing your Peacock video – it is a beautiful bird isn’t it.